Perfume For Women & An Historical Exploration

perfume for women

Perfume for women, 50 Majestic Luxury Designer Brands

By Farah Deba, Staff Writer

The word perfume used today derives from the Latin Per fumum meaning “through smoke”. Perfumery, or the art of making perfumes, began in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt. More than three thousand years, a cuneiform tablet from Mesopotamia identifies a woman named Tapputi as the first recorded perfume maker. They used fragrances in every happy and sad occasion. The high class of the Egyptian Society would wear these perfumes to symbolize their status. Ancient cultures burned a variety of resins and wood at their religious ceremonies.

Scent From Heaven | Al jazeera

Incense made its way to Egypt around 3000 B.C. but until the beginning of Egypt’s Golden Age, perfumes were used only in religious rituals. They became available to all Egyptians as the priests gradually relinquished their exclusive rights. Citizens took elaborate baths and soaked their skin in scented oils for pleasure. The oldest perfumes ever found were discovered by archaeologists on the island of Cyprus. They were more than four thousand years old.

But perfumes could also be found in India at the time. The art of perfumery had existed during the Indus Civilization where the Maharaja of Malwa used on the royalties and counterparts of the harems. During the Indus Civilization, terracotta vessels were used so that fragrant plant materials were covered with boiling water and the vapours soaked the material, from which the oil was pressed or squeezed out.

Perfume for women

The ancient Chinese infused many daily items with perfume such as the ink they wrote with and the stationary they wrote on. They also used perfume in particular spaces such as homes and places of worship. The Chinese also used perfume for disinfection and purity as they believed that perfume could help rid a room of disease. In general, they focused less on anointing their bodies with fragrance and more on using it to scent the world around them. During the Sui and Song dynasties, noble Chinese began to use personal perfumes, importing ingredients via the Silk Road. By the Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties, fragrance use had begun to spread among the public. Oriental fragrances focused heavily on herbs and spices, many of which were also used for food and medicine.

The rise of Christianity, however, saw a decline in the use of perfume for much of the Dark Ages. It was the Muslim world that kept the traditions of perfume alive during this time and started to trade internationally. In Islamic culture, the perfume usage has been recorded since the 6th century and its usage is considered a religious duty. Muhammad(Peace Be Upon Him) said: The taking of a bath on Friday is compulsory for every male Muslim who has attained the age of puberty and (also) the cleaning of his teeth with Miswaak (type of twig used as a toothbrush), and the using of perfume if it is available.

With a rise of Islam, Muslims improved perfume production and continued to use perfumes in daily life and in practising religion. They used musk, roses and amber, among other materials. As traders, Islamic cultures such as the Arabs and Persians had wider access to a wide array of spices, resins, herbs, precious woods, herbs and animal fragrance materials such as ambergris and musk. In addition to trading, many of the flowers and herbs used in perfumery were cultivated by the Muslims — rose and jasmine were native to the region, and many other plants (i.e. bitter orange and other citrus trees, all of which imported from China and southeast Asia) could be successfully cultivated in the Middle East, and are to this day key ingredients in perfumery. Muslims started to trade internationally as a result of which the art of perfumery arrived in Europe.

Perfume for women: Soon Persians took control over the perfumery as a sign of political status and further redefined by Romans and Greek. They saw it as an art and produced in large numbers. It  was  gradually  spread throughout the world. The ancient Greeks can take credit for the first liquid perfume. But it was the development of distillation by the Arabs that made perfume manufacture viable. Perfume enjoyed huge success during the seventeenth century, especially in France. The French later gave the name “parfum” to the smells produced by burning incense.

Hygiene in those days wasn’t great and fragrances were used to mask the unpleasant body odours. In England perfumes were used extensively during the reigns of Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I. All public places were scented during Elizabeth’s rule because she could not tolerate bad smells. The art of perfumery was well known in western Europe since the 13th and 14th century.

50 Amazingly Majestic Luxury Perfumes

1: La Prairie Midnight Rain Eau De Perfume Spray 50ml: Click Here

Tom Ford Costa Azzurra Eau de Perfume – 250 ml

2: Tom Ford Costa Azzurra Eau de Perfume – 250 ml: Click Here

Green Irish Tweed Eau De Perfume Spray 120ml

3: Green Irish Tweed Eau De Perfume Spray 120ml: Click Here

BOND NO9 Dubai Collection Ruby Perfume, 100 ml

4: BOND Dubai Collection Ruby 100 ml: Click Here

Gucci - GUCCI EAU DE PERFUME 75ML VAPO,

5: Gucci – GUCCI EAU DE PERFUME 75ML VAPO: Click Here

6: Francis Kurkdjian Baccarat Rouge 540 Perfume 70 ml: Click Here

Creed Perfume 120 ml

7: Creed Perfume 120 ml: Click Here

BOND NO9 New York Nights Perfume, 100 ml

8: BOND NO9 New York Nights Perfume, 100 ml: Click Here

Bond No. 9 New York Oud Eau De Perfume Spray 50 ml

9: Bond No. 9 New York Oud Eau De Perfume Spray 50 ml: Click Here

FLAGRANT DELICE eau de perfume spray 100 ml

10: FLAGRANT DELICE 100 ml: Click Here

Bond No. 9 Perfume Eau de Parfum Spray 100 ml

11: Bond No. 9 Perfume 100 ml: Click Here

Clive Christian X Perfume Spray 50ml

12: Clive Christian X Spray 50ml: Click Here

Tom Ford Perfume Water for Women - 50ml

13: Tom Ford Perfume Water for Women – 50ml: Click Here

Marc Jacobs Dot Eau De Perfume vaporizador – 100 ml

14: Marc Jacobs Dot Eau De Perfume vaporizador – 100 ml: Click Here

Guerlain Shalimar Perfume Bottle 30ml

15: Guerlain Shalimar 30ml: Click Here

Amouage Gold women’s perfume

16: Amouage Gold women’s perfume: Click Here

Bond Nr 9 Wall Street Eau De Perfume Spray 50ml

17: Bond Nr 9 Wall Street Eau De Perfume Spray 50ml: Click Here

Giorgio Armani  Remix Her Eau de Perfume - 50 ml

18: Giorgio Armani Remix- 50 ml: Click Here

Fragonard ECLAT EAU DE PERFUME, 60ML,(SPARKLING OF FRESH NOTES OF LEMON-FREESIA BERGMOTE ECLAT AGREEMENTS DEPLOYS A LIGHT HEART), AUTHENTIC 100% FROM FRANCE, BEAUTYFULL PACKAGE, LONG LASTING

19: Fragonard ECLAT 60ML: Click Here

Creed Spring Flower 75 ml Eau de Perfume Millesime Spray Women by Creed

20: Creed Spring Flower 75 ml Eau de Perfume Millesime Spray Women by Creed: Click Here

Donna Karan Red Delicious Eau De Perfume Spray 100ml

21: Donna Karan Red Delicious Eau De Perfume Spray 100ml: Click Here

Escada ESCADA eau de perfume spray 30 ml

22: Signature by Escada Eau de Parfum Spray 30ml: Click Here

Verino - VV eau de perfume spray 75 ml

23: Verino – VV 75 ml: Click Here

Chloe Love Eau de Perfume - 50 ml

24: Chloe Love Eau de Perfume – 50 ml: Click Here

Swarovski - AURA eau de perfume spray refillable 50 ml

25: Swarovski – AURA eau de perfume spray refillable 50 ml: Click Here

Chanel No 5 Eau De Parfum Spray 100ml (3.4 Oz) EDP Perfume

26: Chanel No 5 Eau De Parfum Spray 100ml (3.4 Oz) EDP Perfume: Click Here

Women's Perfume Quizás, Quizás, Quizás Loewe EDP

27: QuizÃs, Loewe EDP: Click Here

Juliette Has a Gun Not A Perfume Perfume, 100 ml

28: Juliette Has a Gun Not A Perfume Perfume: Click Here

Black Opium perfume by Yves Saint Laurent Eau De Parfum Spray 3 oz for Women by Yves Saint Laurent

29: Black Opium perfume Eau De Parfum Spray 3 oz for Women by YSL: Click Here

Viktor and Rolf Flowerbomb Eau De Perfume Spray 100ml

30: Viktor & Rolf Flowerbomb Perfume For Women 100ml EDP Spray: Click Here

Dior ADDICT eau de perfume spray 100 ml

31: Dior ADDICT spray 100 ml: Click Here

Givenchy ANGE OU DEMON LE SECRET ELIXIR eau de perfume spray 100 ml

32: Givenchy ANGE OU DEMON LE SECRET ELIXIR eau de perfume spray 100 ml: Click Here

Madawi by Arabian Oud 90ml Women's Perfume

33: Madawi by Arabian Oud 90ml Women’s Perfume: Click Here

34: Coco Mademoiselle by Chanel Eau de Parfum Spray 200ml: Click Here

Moschino Teddy Bear Toy 50milliliter Eau De Toilette EDT Spray Perfume For Her

35: Moschino Teddy Bear Toy 50milliliter Eau De Toilette EDT Spray Perfume For Her: Click Here

Trussardi Inside Eau De Parfum Women's Perfume 50 ml)

36: Trussardi Inside Eau De Parfum Women’s Perfume 50 ml: Click Here

Sisley Women’s Eau Du Soir Perfume 50 ml Eau de Parfum Spray

37: Sisley Women’s Eau Du Soir Perfume 50 ml Eau de Parfum Spray: Click Here

Gucci Gucci By Gucci Perfume EDP 75ml

38: Gucci Perfume EDP 75ml: Click Here

Chopard Happy Spirit Eau De Perfume Spray 75ml

39: Chopard Happy Spirit Eau De Perfume Spray 75ml: Click Here

Van Cleef A Air Eau De Perfume vaporizador 100 ml

40: Van Cleef A Air Eau De Perfume vaporizador 100 ml: Click Here

Paco Rabanne Lady Million Eau de Parfum Spray for Women, 50 ml

41: Paco Rabanne Lady Million Eau de Parfum Spray for Women, 50 ml: Click Here

Paco Rabanne Olympea Eau de Parfum for Women 50 ml

42: Paco Rabanne Olympea Eau de Parfum for Women 50 ml: Click Here

Gucci Guilty Eau de Toilette for Women - 50 ml

43: Gucci Guilty Eau de Toilette for Women – 50 ml: Click Here

Calvin Klein Euphoria for Women Eau de Parfum

44: Calvin Klein Euphoria for Women Eau de Parfum, 50 ml: Click Here

Ted Baker Sweet Treats - Polly - Women's 100ml Eau de Toilette

45: Ted Baker Sweet Treats – Polly – Women’s 100ml Eau de Toilette: Click Here

Jimmy Choo Blossom Eau de Parfum

46: Jimmy Choo Blossom Eau de Parfum, 100 ml: Click Here

Vera Wang Princess Eau de Toilette Fragrance for Women, 100 ml

47: Vera Wang Princess Eau de Toilette Fragrance for Women, 100 ml47: Click Here

Sarah Jessica Parker Lovely Eau De Parfum for Women, 30 ml

48: Sarah Jessica Parker Lovely Eau De Parfum for Women, 30 ml: Click Here

Roberto Cavalli Eau de Parfum 75 ml

49: Roberto Cavalli Eau de Parfum 75 ml: Click Here

Katy Perry Killer Queen Eau de Parfum for Women, 50 ml

50: Katy Perry Killer Queen Eau de Parfum for Women, 50 ml: Click Here

France quickly became the centre of perfume and cosmetic manufacturer. From there it started to emerge into a huge industry. The cultivation of flowers for their perfume essence grew into major industry in the south France especially in Grasse which is now considered the world capital of perfume. Perfumed enjoyed huge success during the 17th century. Perfume became very popular when Louis XV came to the throne in 18th century. His court was called “la cour parfumee” (the perfumed court).

The scent were applied daily , not only to the skin but also to clothing , fan and furniture. Madame de pompadour ordered generous supplies of perfumes and King Louis demanded a different   fragrance for his apartment every day. By the 18th century aromatic plants were being grown in the Grasse region of France to provide the growing industry with raw materials.

After Napoleon came to power exorbitant amounts of money were spent on perfume. He is said to have used sixty bottles of jasmine every month.

Perfume for women

Perfume became very popular in England during the reigns of Henry VIII (reigned 1509-1547) and Queen Elizabeth I (reigned 1558-1603). All public places were scented during Queen Elizabeth’s rule, since she could not tolerate bad smells. The Queen took great pride in creating delightful fragrances and they displayed their skill in mixing scents.

Classification of Perfume

The arts of perfume underwent major change in the 19th century. Changing tastes and the development of modern chemistry laid the foundations of modern perfumery. Perfume types reflect the concentration of aromatic compounds in a solvent, which in fine fragrance is typically ethanol or a mix of water and ethanol. Various sources differ considerably in the definitions of perfume types. The intensity and longevity of a perfume is based on the concentration, intensity, and longevity of the aromatic compounds, or perfume oils, used. As the percentage of aromatic compounds increases, so does the intensity and longevity of the scent. Specific terms are used to describe a fragrance’s approximate concentration by the percent of perfume oil in the volume of the final product. The most widespread terms are:

parfum or extrait, in English known as perfume extract, pure perfume, or simply perfume: 15–40% aromatic compounds esprit de parfum (ESdP): 15–30% aromatic compounds, a seldom used strength concentration in between EdP and perfume.

eau de parfum (EdP) or parfum de toilette (PdT) (The strength usually sold as “perfume 10–20% aromatic compounds (typically 15%); sometimes called “eau de perfume” or “millésime”; parfum de toilette is a less common term, most popular in the 1980s, that is generally analogous to eau de parfum; eau de toilette (EdT): 5–15% aromatic compounds (typically 10%); This is the staple for most masculine perfumes. eau de Cologne (EdC): often simply called cologne: 3–8% aromatic compounds (typically 5%); see below for more information on the confusing nature of the term “cologne”. eau fraiche: products sold as splashes, mists, veils and other imprecise terms. Generally these products contain 3% or less aromatic compounds and are diluted with water rather than oil or alcohol.

Perfume for women

There is much confusion over the term “cologne”, which has three meanings. The first and oldest definition refers to a family of fresh, citrus-based fragrances distilled using extracts from citrus, floral, and woody ingredients. Supposedly these were first developed in the early 18th century in Cologne, Germany, hence the name. This type of “classical cologne” describes unisex compositions “which are basically citrus blends and do not have a perfume parent. “Examples include Mäurer & Wirtz’s 4711 (created in 1799), and Guerlain’s Eau de Cologne Impériale (1853).

In the 20th century, the term took on a second meaning. Fragrance companies began to offer lighter, less concentrated interpretations of their existing perfumes, making their products available to a wider range of customers. Guerlain, for example, offered an Eau de Cologne version of its flagship perfume Shalimar. In contrast to classical colognes, this type of modern cologne is a lighter, diluted, less concentrated interpretation of a more concentrated product, typically a pure parfum. The cologne version is often the lightest concentration from a line of fragrance products.

Perfume for women

Finally, the term “cologne” has entered the English language as a generic, the actual product worn by a man may technically be an eau de toilette, but he may still say that he “wears cologne”. A similar problem surrounds the term “perfume”, which can be used a generic sense to refer to fragrances marketed to women, whether or not the fragrance is actually an extract.

Uses of Perfume

One of the oldest uses of perfume comes from the burning of incense and aromatic herbs for religious services, often the aromatic gums, frankincense and myrrh gathered from trees. It did not take long, though, for people to discover perfume’s romantic potential and it was used both for seduction and as preparation for lovemaking.

With the arrival of eau de cologne, 18th-century France began using perfume for a broad range of purposes. They used it in their bath water, in poultices and enemas, and consumed it in wine or drizzled on a sugar lump.

Perfume for women: Although niche perfume makers remain to cater to the very rich, perfumes today enjoy widespread use—and not just among women. The selling of perfume, however, is no longer just the purview of perfume makers. In the 20th century, clothing designers began marketing their own lines of scents, and almost any celebrity with a lifestyle brand can be found hawking a perfume with their name.

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